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Chinese Instrument Lessons

Private and Group Lessons for Chinese Folk Instruments

private & Group Lessons

Vivace Music School offers private and group lessons for chinese folk instruments such as Erhu, Sheng, Suona, and Gu (Chinese Drum). Advanced Students can also participate in our group classes known as Pak-Kuan Ensemble, in which multi Chinese instruments will be played together. Chinese Drum Group Classes is Now also available based on 1 hour session per week.

Chinese Instrument
Class Booking Exclusive Hotline
0421 072 465

The ERHU

Erhu started to be popular in China during the Sung Dynasty, and underwent great development during the golden age of regional operas. In the late 1800s, under the influence of Hua Yanjun (1893-1950) and Liu Tianhua (1895-1932), the Erhu developed into solo instrument from mainly accompaniment in operas. It has a small sound box and a long neck. It has two strings, with a bow inserted between them. With a range of about three octaves, it’s sound is rather like a violin, but with a thinner tone due to the smaller resonating chamber. The Erhu assumes a central position in the modern Chinese orchestra, as well as in the accompaniment of singing, dancing, and traditional operas.

Suona, The Chinese Oboe

Suona plays an important role in traditional ensembles and regional operas in Northern China. It is also common in the ritual music of Southern China. The traditional Suona has a small double reed, a conical wooden body, and a detachable metal bell. Since the mid-20th century, modernized versions have been developed in China; such instruments have keys similar to those of the European oboe, to allow for playing of chromatic notes and equal tempered tuning. Now the modern Suona family includes the Treble, Alto, Tenor, Bass, even Double Bass. Most of Suona musicians bring more than one instrument along for performances with an orchestra.

THE SHENG

Sheng, one of the oldest instruments. In ancient China, the Sheng played an important role in court music, folk ensembles, and accompaniments for musical storytelling (Quyi) and regional opera (Xiqu). Most modern Sheng consists of 21 or 36 reeds mounted in bamboo pipes with different lengths. Sounds are produced by blowing and sucking the air through the mouthpiece. By virtue of its construction, this unique instrument is capable of making up to six notes simultaneously. Western people commonly call it the “mouth organ”.

The Gu

Suona plays an important role in traditional ensembles and regional operas in Northern China. It is also common in the ritual music of Southern China. The traditional Suona has a small double reed, a conical wooden body, and a detachable metal bell. Since the mid-20th century, modernized versions have been developed in China; such instruments have keys similar to those of the European oboe, to allow for playing of chromatic notes and equal tempered tuning. Now the modern Suona family includes the Treble, Alto, Tenor, Bass, even Double Bass. Most of Suona musicians bring more than one instrument along for performances with an orchestra.